Feb
20
10:30 am10:30

Heres a look at whats to come.....

Now - March 18, 2017

Contemporary Fiber Artists OF Louisiana Exhibit

Now- December 2017

Louisiana's First Spouses Exhibit at Louisiana's Old State Capitol

February 28

Mardi Gras Holiday

March 9

Preserve Louisiana Heritage Lecture: The Butlers of Iberville Parish, David D. Plater (see below for more information)

March 16 - 18

Preserve Louisiana hosts The Slave Dwelling Project with Joseph McGill (see below for more information)

April 4

Preserve Louisiana hosts an Advocacy Workshop at the Old Governor's Mansion, details to be released soon

Save the Date!

May 18-19

Louisiana Trust for Historic Preservation's annual conference, Alexandria

 

 

 

Heritage Lecture: The Butlers of Iberville Parish, Louisiana by historian and author, David Plater, on Thursday, March 9
Mar
9
6:00 pm18:00

Heritage Lecture: The Butlers of Iberville Parish, Louisiana by historian and author, David Plater, on Thursday, March 9

  • Old Governor's Mansion

Preserve Louisiana will host a Heritage Lecture with author David Plater on The Butlers of Iberville Parish, Louisiana, on Thursday, March 9 at 6:30 pm. Plater will explore the remarkable lives of a Louisiana family during one of the most tumultuous periods in American history.

Plater exposes the life of Edward G.W. Butler and his wife Frances Butler as they face triumphs and turmoil in the 1800s. Butler lived in Iberville Parish at the Dunboyne Plantation with his wife and son. The couple began a sugar cane plantation and as their land holdings grew, they amassed more slaves and improved their social prominence in Louisiana's antebellum society.

Yet, when the war cut off agricultural markets and all but destroyed the state's plantation economy, the Butlers were left in financial ruin.

Their experiences at Dunboyne over the next forty years demonstrated the transformations that many land-owning southerners faced in the nineteenth century, from the evolution of agricultural practices and commerce, to the destruction wrought by the Civil War and the transition from slave to free labor and finally to the social, political and economic upheavals of Reconstruction.

Click here to register

 

Save the Date: Living History Lesson  "The Slave Dwelling Project" by Joseph McGill
Mar
16
6:00 pm18:00

Save the Date: Living History Lesson "The Slave Dwelling Project" by Joseph McGill

  • Old Governor's Mansion

Preserve Louisiana will host a panel at the Old Governor's Mansion at 6:30 pm on Thursday, March 16, featuring Joseph McGill of The Slave Dwelling Project and other preservationists who will explore the interpretation of difficult history.

The Slave Dwelling Project is a nationally recognized initiative that explores plantation life from the viewpoint of the slaves. It strives to bring attention to extant slave quarters by inviting people to spend the night in buildings once occupied by slaves.

McGill is a preservationist at the Magnolia Plantation in South Carolina and was inspired to pioneer the project after spending years as a Civil War re-en-actor. He began with a strict focus on South Carolina, sleeping on bedrolls and dirt floors, then traveled across the country. During his travels, he's visited more than 80 dwellings in a variety of conditions in Alabama, Connecticut, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia.

He will enlighten the audience with his experiences and detail the settings of the forgotten shacks and cabins spread across plantation estates. McGill also invites guest to spend the night in the slave cabins located at Oakley Plantation March 18. For more information and to request to participate in the sleepover, contact Fairleigh at fairleigh@preserve-louisiana.org.

Special thanks to the Louisiana Office of Cultural Development for their support of this project.


Feb
9
6:00 pm18:00

Heritage Lecture: The Baby Dolls

Join us on Thursday, February 9 as we celebrate the Mardi Gras season with author Kim Vaz-Deville, who will explore The Baby Dolls, one of the first women’s organizations to mask and perform during Mardi Gras.

The Million Dollar Baby Dolls redefined the New Orleans carnival tradition. Tracing their origins from Storyville brothels and dance halls to their re-emergence in post-Katrina New Orleans, author Kim Marie Vaz-Deville uncovers the history of the "raddy-walking, shake-dancing, cigar-smoking, money-flinging" ladies who strutted their way into a predominantly male establishment.

The Baby Dolls formed around 1912 as an organization for African American women who used their profits from working in New Orleans's red-light district to compete with other Black prostitutes on Mardi Gras. Part of this event involved the tradition of masking, in which carnival groups create a collective identity through costuming. Their baby doll costumes-short satin dresses, stockings with garters, and bonnets-set against a bold and provocative public behavior not only exploited stereotypes but also empowered and made visible an otherwise marginalized female demographic.

Vaz-Deville follows the Baby Doll phenomenon through one hundred years with photos, articles, and interviews and concludes with the birth of contemporary groups such as Antoinette K-Doe's Ernie K-Doe Baby Dolls, the New Orleans Society of Dance's Baby Doll Ladies, and the Tremé Million Dollar Baby Dolls. Her book emphasizes these organizations' crucial contribution to Louisiana's cultural history. Kim Marie Vaz is the associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and professor of education at Xavier University of Louisiana. Her area of research is the use of expressive arts as a response to large-group social trauma.

Jan
27
Jan 29

Preservation Louisiana Tours: Destination, Natchez!

 

Preserve Louisiana’s inaugural Cultural & Architectural Tour will travel to Natchez, MS with host, creator and author of Meanwhile, Back at Café Du Monde… Life Stories about Food, Peggy Sweeney-McDonald, on January 27 - January 29, 2017.

The tour will visit the Rosalie Plantation, Stanton Hall Plantation and downtown Natchez, which includes the Court House and the Thomas H. and John W. Gandy Photograph Collection.

Attendees will also enjoy delicious cuisine at the Carriage House by Mississippi Celebrity Chef Bingo Starr, a barbeque lunch at the Pig Out Inn, a tasting tour of the award winning Charboneau Rum Distillery and dinner at Dunleith Plantation with the Meanwhile, Back at Café Du Monde… show. The tour also includes dinner and wine at the Twin Oaks Plantation which is the private home of best-selling cookbook author, Chef Regina Charboneau.

Sweeney-McDonald will emcee the show with notable local foodies, including Charboneau; owner of Darby’s Famous Fudge, Darby Ward Short; editor of Country Roads Magazine, James Fox-Smith; singer and director of Natchez Pilgrimage Tours, Lynn Beach Smith; andDunleith’s popular mixologist Mark Brockway.

The trip includes transportation, a two-night stay at the Grand Hotel set on the bluffs of the Mississippi River, meals, tours and the Meanwhile, Back at Café Du Monde… show. $826 for singles; $650 each for doubles.

For more information and booking, please register on the link below or call Peggy Sweeney-McDonald at 310.709.2851 or Preserve Louisiana at 225.387.2464.

 

Click Here to Register!

Jan
26
6:00 pm18:00

Something Old Something New Bridal Show

 

Come join us on Thursday, January 26, 2017 for the Something Old, Something New Bridal Event featuring vendors from all around South Louisiana! This bridal event is designed for the bride to view the Mansion at a real wedding reception. See wedding gowns, taste fabulous treats, cocktails and more.

Tickets are $10 if pre-registered and $15 at the door. 

Click Here to Register!

Jan
12
6:00 pm18:00

Heritage Lecture: The Modernist Architecture of Samuel G. and William B. Wiener

Join us on Thursday, January 12 as we kick of the 2017 Heritage Lecture series with a lecture and book signing. Renowned author Guy W. Carwile will discuss the recent publication The Modernist Architecture of Samuel G. and William B. Wiener (LSU Press, 2016).

The Modernist Architecture of Samuel G. and William B. Wiener illuminates an internationally significant yet little-known architectural legacy of Louisiana. In 1933, William B. Wiener collaborated with his half-brother Samuel G. Wiener to design a weekend home for his family on the shore of Cross Lake, just outside Shreveport, Louisiana. A year later the house appeared in the pages of Architectural Forum, the leading architectural journal of its day, as a foremost example of the new modernist style yet to take hold in the United States. The featured home would mark the first in a series of buildings-residential, commercial, and institutional-designed by Samuel (1896-1977) and William (1907-1981) that incorporated the forms and materials found in the new architecture of Europe, later known as the International Style.

These buildings composed one of the largest and earliest clusters of modernist buildings by American-born architects and placed the unexpected area of northern Louisiana in the forefront of architectural innovation in the mid-twentieth century.

Carwile will examine the work of the Wiener brothers from the 1920s through the 1960s, detailing the evolutionary process of their designs and exploring why modern architecture appeared so early in this southern city.

Click Here to Register!